Stand By for a Great Catholic Ebook Sale

IndieCatholicWritersSaleHi, everyone.

This coming week the members of the Indie Catholic Authors Google+ group are having a sale. From June 24th to 26th, 16 great Catholic books (including Church Triumphant) will be available for 99 cents or less. Visit the Indie Catholic Authors blog post for more information: https://indiecatholicauthors.wordpress.com/2015/06/15/major-catholic-ebook-sale-next-week/.

P.S. We desperately need your help. Please sign up for our Thunderclap campaign so we can reach more people. If you sign up, Thunderclap will post a one-time message on you Facebook, Twitter, or Tumblr account on June 24th about the sale. If we don’t get the required 100 supporters by the 24th, no messages will be sent out. Please hurry, we only have 3 days left. Thanks in advance

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Cardinal Burke Fighting Heresy

BurkePreventingHeresy

Source: St. Peter’s List

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Saint eBook Now Available for Pre-Order

Church Triumphant ebook

Church Triumphant ebook

I’m happy to announce the release of my new ebook about the saints, Church Triumphant: 25 Men and Women who Gave Their Lives to Christ. This new ebook is available for preorder from Amazon, Barnes and NobleKobo, and iTunes. Church Triumphant will be officially released on April 5th, Easter Sunday.

This book includes the biographies of the following saints: St. Gonsalo Garcia, St. Andreas Wouters, Blessed Charles I of Austria, Blessed Charles de Foucauld, St. Clement Maria Hofbauer, St. Gabriel of Our Lady of Sorrows, St. Gerard Majella, St. Gianna Molla, Blessed John Henry Newman, St. Maria Goretti, St. Maximilian Kolbe, St. Nicholas, St Peter Julian Eymard, Blessed Pier Giorgio Frassati, St. Padre Pio of Pietrelcina, Pope St. Pius X, St. Teresa Benedicta of the Cross, St. Charbel Makhluf, Venerable Bishop Frederic Baraga, Venerable Fulton J. Sheen, Blessed José Luis Sánchez del Río, St. Kateri Tekakwitha, St. Marianne Cope, Blessed Miguel Pro, Servant of God Father Patrick Peyton.

If you have friends who enjoy reading about the saint, please tell them about Church Triumphant: 25 Men and Women who Gave Their Lives to Christ.

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What is Laetare Sunday?

Today is Laetare Sunday, also known as the fourth Sunday of Lent. Laetare Sunday is one of the most solemn days of the year. It takes it’s name from the first word of the entrance antiphon or introit: “Laetare Jerusalem: et conventum facite omnes qui diligitis eam: gaudete cum laetitia”, “Rejoice, O Jerusalem: and come together all you that love her: rejoice with joy”. On this one day, the Church interrupts the solemn and penitent air of the previous days and weeks of Lent with words of joy and rejoicing. Why? It seems so out of place during a time when we have been constantly reminded since Ash Wednesday to drive sin out of our lives with prayer and fasting. To suddenly be called to rejoice seems to be out of character for the season.

"Weltliche Schatzkammer Wien (129)" by MyName (Gryffindor) - Own work. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Weltliche_Schatzkammer_Wien_(129).JPG#/media/File:Weltliche_Schatzkammer_Wien_(129).JPG

Golden Rose by Giuseppe and Pietro Paolo Spagna. Rome, around 1818/19. Kept today in the Imperial Treasury in Hofburg Imperial Palace in Vienna.

However, this one day of rejoicing in the middle of Lent is a sign that the Church deeply understands the needs of her children. She knows the we need all the encouragement we can get. So in the midst of our penance and mortification, the Church gives us a preview of the coming joys of Easter to give us the courage to finish the race, to fight the good fight.

On Laetare Sunday, the priest wears rose colored vestments, instead of the Lenten purple, as a sign of rejoicing. This tradition originated from an ancient papal ceremony called the Blessing of the Golden Rose. The practise is thought to have originated in the Middle Ages. The pope would often bless a golden rose either before or during the Laetare Sunday Mass. Afterwards, the newly blessed rose would be sent to a Catholic monarch, church, or city as a sign of honor. Pope Innocent III said the following: “As Laetare Sunday, the day set apart for the function, represents love after hate, joy after sorrow, and fullness after hunger, so does the rose designate by its colour, odour and taste, love, joy and satiety respectively.”

Now, go forth and rejoice for the glories of Easter are close at hand.

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Announcing Release Date of Church Triumphant Ebook

Church Triumphant ebook

Church Triumphant ebook

I announced in January that I would release a book about the saints during Lent. I am now happy to announce that Church Triumphant: 25 Men and Women who Gave Their Lives to Christ will be released on Easter Sunday. Starting next week, it will be available for preorder on Amazon, Smashwords, iTunes, and other ebook stores. Stay tuned for links when I upload it.

Also, take a moment to sign up for my new e-newsletter. Every time a new article is posted, you will get an email. Email subscribers will also get special offers on this and all upcoming ebooks.

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Ebooks coming

If you enjoyed my saint biographies, I have good news for you. I’m planning to release a collection of 20 saint biographies in ebook form. I’m going to add to the ones I have written already and write several new ones. I don’t have a title. Feel free to suggest one in the comment section. I’m aiming to release it during Lent this year.

I’m also planning to published a second ebook collecting the articles I have written on SSPX. That should be published by the middle of the year.

Stay tuned for more updates, including covers.

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Chasing Liberty: a Review – Part 1

Chasing Liberty by Theresa Linden

Chasing Liberty by Theresa Linden

Note: I received an advanced reader’s copy of this book from the author for this review.

This is part one of a two-part review of Theresa Linden‘s new book Chasing Liberty. Part 1 will take a look at the religious aspects of Chasing Liberty. Part 2 will examine the overall writing and will be published on my writing blog.

Book Description

Liberty 554-062466-84 of Aldonia lives in a responsible society that cares for the earth and everyone on it. They have learned to balance resource consumption with replacement initiatives, unavoidable pollution with clean-environment efforts. Science ensures that every baby born is healthy. The government ensures that every baby born is needed. All are cared for, taught, and given a specific duty to perform, their unique contribution to society. Why is Liberty so unsatisfied?

In less than two weeks, Liberty must begin her vocation. Every girl in Aldonia wishes she had Liberty’s vocation. Liberty would rather flee from Aldonia and live on her own, independent of the all-controlling government, the Regimen Custodia Terra. The high electrical Boundary Fence crushes any thought of escape. The ID implant imbedded in her hand makes it impossible to hide. She has no choice but to submit. Liberty is slated to be a Breeder.

As vocation day draws near, a man with an obsession for Liberty attacks her and injects her with a drug. She’s about to lose consciousness when someone comes to her rescue, a man in a mottled cape and dark glasses. She wakes in an underground facility where people watch over Aldonia with an array of monitors and surveillance equipment. These people are full of secrets, but she discovers one thing: they rescue a man scheduled for re-education. They rescued him. They can rescue her.

Now for the Review

Theresa has skillfully constructed a world that is a combination of George Orwell’s 1984 and Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World. In this future possible, the building blocks of society have been purged from common knowledge. A one world government teaches the people that such ancient ideas as “family”, “God”, and “free-will” are evil and lead to disaster and ruin. Theresa said that she based her novel on what she read in the news headlines and I’m afraid she’s right. We live in a society that is trying to undermine the traditional family structure and trivialize faith and religion. In the world of the Regimen, science has replaced religion.

The main character of the story, Liberty 554-062466-84, has been raised in a Godless society, but still feels a strange stirring in her soul. When she’s troubled or worried, she often feels the comforting presence of her “Friend”. It seems that at least one or two other characters share her yearning for something more. That leads me to something I just read a couple of days ago.

In 1969, Fr. Joseph Ratzinger (the future Pope Benedict XVI) gave a series of talks in the future of Catholicism that were later compiled and published in a book entitled Faith and the Future. I came upon this quote after finishing Chasing Liberty:

Men in a totally planned world will find themselves unspeakably lonely. If they have completely lost sight of God, they will feel the whole horror of their poverty. Then they will discover the little flock of believers as something wholly new. They will discover it as a hope that is meant for them, an answer for which they have always been searching in secret.

In the world of Chasing Liberty, the citizens of the Regimen fill their lives with entertainment, so they can no longer hear God calling to them. It’s sad to say, but that is true of today’s culture and it will only get worse. Pope Benedict’s words are coming true in front of our eyes.

Conclusions of Part 1

Overall, Chasing Liberty stands as a warning of what will surely come to pass if we do not change and pray. The family will be destroyed and children will eventually become a product of the State. Religion will be replaced with science and the worship of nature. Free-will will be replaced by State designated vocations.

I will give my final recommendation and rating in part 2.

Stayed tuned for part 2.

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